By Shane Chuning

I know I did a brief review of the Bear Motive 6 in last month’s issue, but I wanted to do a follow up with some more information, along with a review of the Easton Injexion arrows. Bear Archery in my opinion has come on really strong the last few years with their bow line-up. The Motive series are by far my favorite models to date. With the introduction of the new H13 cam, it will sure gain popularity amongst avid archers and bow hunters, alike. Take the Motive 6 and combine that with the Easton Carbon Injexion arrows and you have a combo that really packs a punch, with loads of kinetic energy. Since this bow peaked my interest so much, I had to get in on the action and ordered one myself. I would now like to share a more in-depth look at tuning this combination.

Bear Motive 6 @ Full DrawFirst off, the specs on my particular setup are 70 pounds, 29 inch draw with and Easton Carbon Injexion 330’s cut to 27” raw shaft with a 100 grain tip. Being a new bow model and not working with many to date, I like to start off by seeing if my centershot will work dead down the middle of the bow. In this case on the Motive 6 that would be at 3/4 inch to center of shaft from inside face of riser. I adjusted the LimbDriver Micro Elite rest to that position and then went on to set my nock height. Now I am very familiar with Hybrid Cam systems, so I figured this H13 Cam would tune fairly similar. In most cases with a Hybrid cam system they will tune nock level to 1/8 inch nock high. The ones that have the better vertical nock travel will tune closer to nock level. For the Motive 6 I was hoping this was the case, so I set it to 1/16 inch nock high to start my tuning process. Now before I go any further in my tuning process, I need to check my draw length, as well as cam synchronization.

Let’s start with draw length. I am generally a 29” draw and feel comfortable out to 29 3/8 inches. The Motive 6 has rotating mods to change draw length without the need of a press, which is very handy for guys not quite sure on their actual draw length. This bow adjusts in half inch increments and you will see numbers from 6 to 10 on the cams, 10 being the 30”draw position. With that said, I set it in the number 9 position for the 29 inches and then proceeded to check it on my draw board. Well, it was coming in at 5/8 of an inch too long and actually measuring 29 5/8, which is a bit too long for me. I decided to switch mod positions into the 28.5 inch slot and rechecked on my draw board. This came in right at 29 1/8 inch, which is right where I wanted it to be.

This gives you a way to measure the amount of pre lean on a bow.

This gives you a way to measure the amount of pre lean on a bow.

Now cam synchronization is the next step. What I find on Hybrid Cam systems is generally slight top cam advancement tunes best and feels best at full draw. This means the top cam draw stop will hit just a touch before the bottom, roughly a credit card to 1/16 inch a head or that would be your gap between the bottom stop and the cable while your top cam is touching the cable at full draw. I adjusted accordingly for this by adding three twists in the Buss Cable, since my top cam was lagging behind the bottom. I finalized this by checking it on the draw board and I was good to go.

The next thing I like is to get in a decent starting position is my top cams pre lean. Any Hybrid Cam bow will have a Buss Cable with a split harness or yoke, attached to the top axle. This is used to control your lateral nock travel and will greatly affect your arrow flight as well as your broadheads flying with your fieldpoints. I like to see as minimal pre lean on these systems as possible and this is how I generally check them. I take a shaft and lay it on the left side of the top cam for a right handed shooter. Then I project that down to my nocking point and see where it falls in relation to the string. Usually a good starting point for this is just crossing the string at the nocking point. I set this particular one up so the Easton Injexion crossed at about 1/16 of an inch past the right side of my string.

This was a bareshaft and fletched at 10 yards. As you can see the left to right impact is perfect and was adjusted by twisting or untwisting the yoke or split harness. It also shows how tough the Easton Injexions are. If you look close the nock was hit dead center and blown wide open by the bareshaft. I had to replace the nock but shaft was still perfectly intact.

This was a bareshaft and fletched at 10 yards. As you can see the left to right impact is perfect and was adjusted by twisting or untwisting the yoke or split harness. It also shows how tough the Easton Injexions are. If you look close the nock was hit dead center and blown wide open by the bareshaft. I had to replace the nock but shaft was still perfectly intact.

Now to test this, every set up is different. Your goal here is the best possible lateral nock travel you can get. To do this you shoot a bare shaft at 10 yards with your fletched arrow and adjust accordingly by adding or taking out twist in your yoke. In this case, my bare shafts were impacting left of my fletched arrows, slightly. Now to adjust for this you want to walk your bare shafts back to your fletched and if they are impacting left you will add twist to the right side of the yoke, while taking out the same amount to the left side. By doing it this way, you insure your cam synch stays true while adjusting for the best lateral nock travel at the same time. With the Motive 6 and the Easton Injexion 330’s the right side of the shaft that is against the top cam matched the left side of the string at the nocking point, which proved to be ideal with this setup.

With all that down and adjusted, it was time to shoot a little to see how the Motive 6 performed. I was so pleased with the initial setup and tune, it literally only took about five shots to get everything where I wanted it. Granted, I have been around many bows to know where some good starting points would be for tuning, but this was a very good sign of a very friendly shooting bow. The only complaint that I would have regarding the Motive 6 is the factory strings. They have some peep rotation issues that I would like to see fixed. Other than that, this bow is a solid performer that is sure to please.

Bear Motive 6 ChronoI ended up with 70 pounds, 29 inch draw, 423 gr Easton Carbon Injexion 330 at 310 fps. That puts this combo at a big 90 ft lb of kinetic energy. These arrows have not been on the market that long, but I must say I am very pleased with them. The small diameter thick walled construction, make for a very tough and durable arrow. They have been performing exceptionally well in all conditions and really pack a punch down range. The specs have been coming in with very tight tolerances for an all carbon arrow and are quickly becoming my preferred choice. I would even say they are as tight of tolerances as some of your carbon aluminum arrows. The only down fall at this time I can see with these shafts are the limited selection of broadheads that will work with the Deep Six inserts. This year there have been more companies coming out with their own Deep Six broadheads and I feel this will just grow as time goes by.

When in the market for a combination that really packs a punch and worth looking at, I would not hesitate to narrow your choices down to the Bear Motive 6 and Easton Injexion combination. More than likely, you will be very pleased with your choice.